PROGRESSIVE RECESSION

101 TV SETS

TV INTERRUPTIONS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3yMWASb8_c&feature=player_embedded

http://www.westminster.ac.uk/news-and-events/events/2012/end-piece

David Hall, a monumental new commission ‘1001 TV Sets (End Piece)’ 1972-2012, as well as restaging two seminal early works.

This timely exhibition vividly heralds the end of analogue TV in the UK as London finally switches to digital on 18 April 2012.

The contemporary reworking of one of Hall’s early major works ‘101 TV sets’ will form the centrepiece of the exhibition. ‘1001 TV Sets (End Piece)’ features 1,001 cathode ray tube TV sets, of all ages and conditions, which will fill the massive Ambika P3 subterranean space. The TVs will be tuned to different analogue stations playing randomly in a cacophony of electronic signals, gradually reducing between April 4 and April 18, as the final analogue signals are broadcast from London’s Crystal Palace. When transmission is turned off, the multiple sets will emit only terminal audio hiss and a visual sea of white noise.

David Hall’s first works for television appeared unannounced on Scottish TV in 1971. The transmissions were a surprise, a mystery, and have been acknowledged as the first artist interventions seen on British television. An installation version of these early ‘TV Interruptions’ will be exhibited in Ambika P3 alongside ‘Progressive Recession’ a multi-screen interactive work utilising 9 cameras and 9 monitors as complex analogical mirrors.

Internationally recognised for his groundbreaking work in the field of video art, David Hall (b. 1937) has often been cited as its most influential pioneer in Britain. Hall started his work as a sculptor and was awarded first prize for sculpture at the Biennale de Paris in 1965 and the following year he took part in the first major exhibition of Minimalist art, Primary Structures, New York (1966) before turning to photography, film and video. He participated in the formation of the Artist Placement Group with John Latham and others in 1966; was a co-organiser of the seminal international Video Show exhibition at the Serpentine Gallery, London in 1975; and was co-curator of the first video installations exhibition at Tate in 1976. In the same year he initiated and was a founding member of the artists’ organisation London Video Arts (now part of LUX). His work is in major international collections and has recently featured in exhibitions in Vienna, Berlin, Toronto, Dresden and Santiago de Compostela (see: http://www.davidhallart.com).

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